Week 8 Summer Teaching Tips

When/how do I post summer grades? An email was sent to all faculty (from Sara Clark) on Tuesday, July 14th with the following information: All final grades for full term Summer 2015 courses must be posted in e-services on or before Wednesday, July 29th, 2015 by 11:59 pm. You may begin posting final grades for full term summer courses on Friday, July 17th, 2015. For classes that are not full term, your grading windows are as follows: three full days after the end of the term. Drafts will open seven days before the last day of the term. Posting can begin three days before the end of the term. If you are teaching a short term course that ends (has ended) before the end of summer semester, you may post grades once the course has ended. Once a short term course has finished, please enter grades as soon as you are able to do so. A copy of the instructions for both Grade Entry, and submitting grade changes have been attached for your convenience. The documents are also available on the share drive at S:\Faculty\Grade Entry. Need to change or correct a grade? Please see attached “How to submit grade changes”

I need to plan! How do I know what is going on next year?

2015-2016 Academic Calendar is the official calendar for Faculty Development Days, holidays, breaks, and other days when classes are not in session. The college also maintains communications of upcoming dates/events through the website Academic Calendar, as well as the InsideMCTC newsletter and MCTC employee blog.

What is happening during Opening Days (August 19, 20 & 21)?  CTL will be offering an All Faculty Session on Thursday, August 20th, from 8am until 10am and Faculty Breakout Sessions will take place from 10:15-11:45 immediately following. Time has also been set aside for an all college session, an MSCF potluck, Coordinators meeting, PDD meetings, and Common Course Outline project work. Administration will also be scheduling sessions to engage in critical dialogues with faculty.

The complete schedule for these days will be sent out via various communications, including in a letter from Avelino that will accompany faculty appointment letters (anticipated to be sent out next week), as well as InsideMCTC announcements. Speak with your Dean if you have specific questions about your participation in Faculty Development Days.

What is universal design, and how can I use it to increase learning? “While courses, technology, and student services are typically designed for the narrow range of characteristics of the average student, the practice of universal design in education (UDE) considers people with a wide range of characteristics in the design of all educational products and environments. UDE goes beyond accessible design for people with disabilities to make all aspects of the educational experience more inclusive for students, parents, staff, instructors, administrators, and visitors with a great variety of characteristics. These characteristics include those related to gender, race and ethnicity, age, stature, disability, and learning style.​” Click here to learn more!  Here’s a 13-minute video overview of universal design and strategies to use to help you classes be more inclusive.

Some easy things you can do in your class to make your learning environment more inclusive​

  • Use video captions. If you show a video in class, turn the captions on. If you provide links to videos, choose ones with text or captions. This will not only help students with reduced hearing but also students who are English-language learners, visual learners, etc.
  • Post class materials online before class to provide all text in a digital format​. This can help all students prepare for class, can help students who need to miss class, and can help students who need to convert materials (for example, into braille). If a student can read your class materials and gain as much learning as attending class, then modify your materials and class time so that students gain learning in class that they could not gain on their own.
  • Provide various ways for all students to participate. If you like to pose questions to the class and hear responses from a few students, first have students do a pair up to answer the question so that all students get the chance to respond in their pairs. If students are assessed for participation, provide multiple ways for students to participate such as writing their answers in class and turning them in, bringing resources to the class/group in the next class session, posting on online Discussion between classes, or submitting a response online or in the next class. As we heard from the disability student panel next week, writing or speaking in class can create anxiety for students, and these methods can allow students to participate in other ways.
  • Experiment with moving the tables and chairs in your classroom to see what works best for you and your students. For example, if you have an interpreter in your class, moving tables so students sit in a circle provides more places that the interpreter and student can communicate.
  • Include various types of assessments in your classes so that students have many ways to demonstrate skills. Including many low-stakes assessments can reduce anxiety for all students (and can help to decrease cheating). These might be ungraded tasks in class or between classes or smaller assignments or quizzes building up to larger assignments or exams. Scaffolding skills can help all learners.
  • Include various teaching methods and order of activities in your classes. Some students love lectures and some hate them. Breaking up your lectures with activities or breaking up your activities with explanations and clarifications can help all students. Different students not only benefit from different learning strategies but also different sequences of activities. For example, some students learn best by first hearing an explanation then seeing a visual, and other students might learn best in the opposite order.

What should I read over the break? CTL invites you to read any of the following books to discuss during Fall Opening Days (Aug19-21, 2015):

Back to School: Why Everyone Deserves A Second Chance at Education by Mike Rose

Blindspot: Hidden Biases of Good People by Mahzarin R. Banaji

Creating Significant Learning Experiences: An Integrated Approach to Designing College Courses by L. Dee Fink

Make it Stick: The Science of Successful Learning by Peter C. Brown

Pedagogy of the Oppressed* by Paul Freire

*facilitated discussions of Pedagogy of the Oppressed will be scheduled on an ongoing basis during Fall 2015 semester.

CTL made copies of these books available for checkout through the Resource Library in T2000. You are invited to stop by to see if there are any copies available before purchasing yourself, or check your local library.

Do you want to go back to something in a previous Teaching Tips?  All of these are archived on our website through the News link, and the link is always in our email signature line.

How can I learn more about using D2L Brightspace in my classes?  Contact drl@minneapolis.edu

Where can I get help with teaching or other parts of my teaching role?  Email ctl@minneapolis.edu

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Week 7 Summer Teaching Tips

What is contemplative pedagogy? “Contemplative pedagogy serves several educational goals. Research shows that contemplative practice, even if performed for short periods, improves attention, cognition, and cognitive flexibility.” (from Contemplative Studies in Higher Education)

How Can I use it in my classroom?

I start every class with what I call a Mindful Moment:

I ask the students to sit with the feet flat on the floor and to refresh their posture, close their eyes if they are comfortable. Settle into the space; anything that came before this or is coming after doesn’t matter; the only reality at the moment is the present. We then take at least 5 breaths where we inhale through the nose allowing the heart to fill and chest to expand; exhale out the nose, chest relaxes and pull the belly in towards the spine. I invite them to bring to the mind and embrace with the heart something, someone they are grateful for (I usually remind them here that it is even encouraged if they are grateful about something about themselves). I invite them to share that gratitude with others by getting up at the sound of the bell to greet a classmate with a kind touch (handshake, pat on back, fist bump, even a hug) and eye contact. Bell rings and they engage. It has really been a beautiful thing to experience and I am so grateful to be a part of it! — from Jennifer Mason, PHED Faculty

Bayla McDougal, Faculty in Addiction Counseling, took a sabbatical during Fall 2013 and wrote a book about using contemplative practices in the classroom. She is happy to share her work and talk with other faculty about how to get started.

How do I learn more?

Practice! MCTC Contemplative Practice Sessions on Wednesdays 1:00-1:30pm (10:30-11am during Fall) in the Library’s Room to Breathe (5 minutes stretching, 20 minute quiet sitting (some guidance), 5 minutes to process if needed).

Observe: The Mindfulness and Attention Awareness Inventory (MAAS) has been used to assess an individual’s core characteristic of mindfulness.

Explore! Center for Contemplative Mind in Society

Read about it Contemplative Pedagogy…

Talk to colleagues, including Bayla McDougal and Jennifer Mason (among others)

What should I read over the summer? CTL invites you to read any of the following books over the summer to discuss during Fall Opening Days (Aug19-21, 2015):

Back to School: Why Everyone Deserves A Second Chance at Education by Mike Rose

Blindspot: Hidden Biases of Good People by Mahzarin R. Banaji

Creating Significant Learning Experiences: An Integrated Approach to Designing College Courses by L. Dee Fink

Make it Stick: The Science of Successful Learning by Peter C. Brown

Pedagogy of the Oppressed* by Paul Freire

*facilitated discussions of Pedagogy of the Oppressed will be scheduled on an ongoing basis during Fall 2015 semester.

CTL made copies of these books available for checkout through the Resource Library in T2000. You are invited to stop by to see if there are any copies available before purchasing yourself, or check your local library.

Do you want to go back to something in a previous Teaching Tips?  All of these are archived on our website through the News link, and the link is always in our email signature line.

How can I learn more about using D2L Brightspace in my classes?  Contact drl@minneapolis.edu

Where can I get help with teaching or other parts of my teaching role?  Email ctl@minneapolis.edu

If you have ideas for future Teaching Tips or would like to write a guest blog post for the CTL blog, please contact Jennifer.Sippel@minneapolis.edu Thanks!

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Week 6 Summer Teaching Tips

Textbook buyback. The MCTC Bookstore’s End of Summer Term Textbook Buyback is scheduled for July 22-23, 9am – 3pm in front of the Bookstore. Please help get the word out to students, thanks!

textbook buyback summer 2015

What are some upcoming faculty-development opportunities?

Featured upcoming event: D2L Brightspace: Getting Started. Free webinars for instructors who are new to D2L Brightspace | July 27- August 28 | Are you looking for opportunities to learn more about how to effectively set up your courses using D2L Brightspace? Brightspace is an integrated suite of web-based tools that help instructors manage their courses including content, discussion forums, assignments, grades and overall course design.

The MnSCU Special Interest Group: Learning Spaces & Instructional Technologies will be holding a series of free 1-hour webinars to get faculty who are new to D2L Brightspace up and running. Internet access available from home or campus – whichever works for you. Session size is limited!  Full description, dates and registration here.

Check the Events page of the CTL website for more upcoming faculty development opportunities!

I need to plan! How do I know what is going on next year?

2015-2016 Academic Calendar is the official calendar for Faculty Development Days, holidays, breaks, and other days when classes are not in session. The college also maintains communications of upcoming dates/events through the website Academic Calendar, as well as the InsideMCTC newsletter and MCTC employee blog.

Speaking of planning, what is going on during August 19, 20 & 21? CTL is co-planning these days (aka-Opening Days) with MCTC administrative leadership. We hope to have a published schedule before the end of summer term. Please do not schedule other meetings during these days, and please do not rely on these days for course prep as your participation in these days is critical (and for many faculty, required). Speak with your Dean if you have specific questions about your participation in Faculty Development Days.

What is stereotype threat, and how can I decrease it to increase student performance?

Stereotype threat refers to being at risk of confirming, as self-characteristic, a negative stereotype about one’s group (Steele & Aronson, 1995). This term was first used by Steele and Aronson (1995) who showed in several experiments that Black college freshmen and sophomores performed more poorly on standardized tests than White students when their race was emphasized. When race was not emphasized, however, Black students performed better and equivalently with White students. The results showed that performance in academic contexts can be harmed by the awareness that one’s behavior might be viewed through the lens of racial stereotypes.  Click here to learn more. And here’s an  8-minute video overview of stereotype threat.

Some easy things you can do in your class to make your learning environment more inclusive​:

  • Convey the value of diversity.  For example, use examples of role models from in-groups, use diversity as a resource, and create a critical mass by helping students identify similarities between peers.
  • Support students’ sense of belonging.   For example, do not call attention to minority status or gender, remind students of in-group characteristics (e.g., “You’re all college students…”), foster inter-group conversations, and anonymize tests/assignments (or have students write name at end)
  • Help students manage feelings of stress.   For example, remind students that everyone feels tension, tell them about a time you struggled then prevailed, or use address pre-text anxiety.
  • Promote a growth mindset.  Remind students that the more we use our minds, the better they will work; praise efforts, not intelligence or results; and include teaching methods that help students develop thinking habits and study strategies.
  • Convey and expect high standards. Express to students that you have high standards for academic achievement and believe that all students are capable of achieving these high standards.
  • Give wise criticism.  Avoid bad criticism, undeserved praise, and non-feedback.

Do you want to go back to something in a previous Teaching Tips?  All of these are archived on our website through the News link, and the link is always in our email signature line.

How can I get relevant, confidential and timely feedback on my teaching? Request a 5&5 Assessment! For more information, or to place your request, please contact: ctl@minneapolis.edu by no later than Friday, July 10th. Due to reduced Summer CTL credits, availability is limited.

How can I learn more about using D2L Brightspace in my classes?  Contact drl@minneapolis.edu

Where can I get help with teaching or other parts of my teaching role?  Email ctl@minneapolis.edu

If you have ideas for future Teaching Tips or would like to write a guest blog post for the CTL blog, please contact Jennifer.Sippel@minneapolis.edu Thanks!

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Week 5 Summer Teaching Tips

Minnesota eLearning Summit Discount Registration Ends Soon!

If you haven’t yet attended, perhaps this is the year to do so. This year MnSCU will support of 75% of the cost of early registration fees for all attendees and presenters from MnSCU community colleges, state universities, and technical colleges. MnSCU registrants should enter the Coupon Code X304 when registering online. The discount will be calculated automatically. This discount is only available for the early registration fee which expires on July 1st (end of the day). After the 75% discount, the cost of this two-day conference with early bird registration is only $61.25 to any MnSCU attendee.

How can I create and share videos with my students?  Look at using MediaSpace (formerly known as Kaltura) to host your media content. You will have MnSCU (and FERPA) approved secure space to house all of your media and the media you host will easily embed into D2L Brightspace.  Additionally, MediaSpace allows you to do Webcam Recording and ScreenCasting and it is all free!  Contact the DRL for more information.

Want to get students to practice considering other perspectives? Have them watch this TED talk, Take ‘The Other’ to Lunch. The premise is to go to lunch with someone who doesn’t agree with you and asking them three questions to find out what’s really in their hearts. Write a one-page summary of lessons learned. What did you learn that was new in the video? What did you learn that was surprising? Who will you take to lunch, and why?

Want to connect your content things happening outside the classroom? Ask your students to find a current event news article relevant to the class topic, and to bring back a description of it using the 5Ws: who, what, when, where, why and how. Don’t forget to have them cite their source!

Do you want to go back to something in a previous Teaching Tips?  All of these are archived on our website through the News link, and the link is always in our email signature line.

How can I get relevant, confidential and timely feedback on my teaching? Request a 5&5 Assessment! For more information, or to place your request, please contact: ctl@minneapolis.edu by no later than Friday, July 10th. Due to reduced Summer CTL credits, availability is limited.

What are upcoming faculty-development opportunities?  Check the Events page of the CTL website.

How can I learn more about using D2L in my classes?  Contact drl@minneapolis.edu

Where can I get help with teaching or other parts of my teaching role?  Email ctl@minneapolis.edu

If you have ideas for future Teaching Tips or would like to write a guest blog post for the CTL blog, please contact Jennifer.Sippel@minneapolis.edu Thanks!

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Week 4 Summer Teaching Tips

Welcome to the midpoint of summer session!

How do I let students know how they are doing? Now is an excellent time to check in with students about their progress. If possible, check in with every student in person, or with a personalized note. During the first day of class, I have students write down a SMART goal (including possible barriers and strategies for overcoming barriers). I use my mid-semester check in to revisit those goals with the students. I also remind students that their progress is a reflection of the work they are doing in the course, not of them personally, and we discuss strategies for how to finish the course successfully.

Here are some tips to help students prepare for tests or assignments, including some easy strategies to break up your lectures and engage students in the material and with each other.

How can I help students prepare for the first test of assignment?

  • ​​Break up your lecture by having students complete a 1-minute paper to
    • identify main themes in the class so far
    • ask questions they have about the upcoming assignment
    • write about the “muddiest” point (in other words, what was most unclear to them in the class; take this a step further by asking which strategies they are going to use to clarify this before the test or assignment)
  • Have students complete a pre-assignment or pre-quiz in class or at home. Often, students do not do well because they misjudge how long an assignment or studying will take. If you have students completing a project or paper, have them turn first turn in short assignments such as a resource list, thesis statement, draft, etc.
  • Direct students to the Assignment Planner on the MCTC library web site which includes links to great resources for completing and scheduling steps for the assignment.
  • Rather than providing a study guide for students, have students make a study guide. This might be an assignment they complete outside of class and turn in or something they work in groups to create within class. Have students share these with one another in class or by posting within D2L so they can see other ways to study and approach the material. Early in the course, you might provide more direction such as main themes or a worksheet then provide less assistance as the class progresses.
  • Have students write sample exam questions then post in the D2L Discussions (or share in class) so other students can use these as practice questions. You could also use some of these on your tests to help decrease your work.

Do you want to go back to something in a previous Teaching Tips?  All of these are archived on our website through the News link, and the link is always in our email signature line.

Do you wonder which services Public Safety offers for faculty? See safetytipsCTL.

Do you want new ways to check in with your students?  Include a short writing assignment asking them one or more of the following.

  • What is most unclear so far in the class, and how do you plan to clarify it before the next test/assignment?
  • How do you plan to study for the next test? OR What is your plan to complete the first assignment/paper?
  • How was the first test similar or different than you expected?
  • Which study strategies have been most effective so far?
  • How do you plan to improve your score on the next assignment/test?
  • What is keeping you from performing as you had hoped in this class? Which strategies can you use to overcome this or future barriers?
  • How many hours do you spend on this class each week? Do you think this is too much or too little time? Why or why not?

Do you want more resources?  The latest issue of the Journal on Excellence in College Teaching is available through MCTC’s journal subscriptions here.

How can I get relevant, confidential and timely feedback on my teaching? Request a 5&5 Assessment! For more information, or to place your request, please contact: ctl@minneapolis.edu by no later than Friday, July 10th. Due to reduced Summer CTL credits, availability is limited.

What are upcoming faculty-development opportunities?  Check the Events page of the CTL website.

How can I learn more about using D2L in my classes?  Contact drl@minneapolis.edu

Where can I get help with teaching or other parts of my teaching role?  Email ctl@minneapolis.edu

If you have ideas for future Teaching Tips or would like to write a guest blog post for the CTL blog, please contact Jennifer.Sippel@minneapolis.edu Thanks!

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Week 3 Summer Teaching Tips

What are your students thinking about your class?  These links refer to first-day activities, but these simple strategies would also work well at this point in the semester:

A questionnaire and a quiz

Gauge student expectation…

Gauge student misconceptions early on

Are you having trouble with students using technology in your classes?

Smart phones in the classroom? Let students decide.

Today’s Lesson: Life in the Classroom Before Cell phones

One of the outcomes of the CTL is to create a communities of learners. We want to create opportunities for faculty to learn together and for faculty to create community within their classrooms. Research has shown that student-student and student-faculty interactions are important for student retention and persistence. Using teams/groups in our classes is an excellent way to create community. Groups can be informal (e.g., think-pair-share) or more formal and structured.

TEAMS/GROUPS

Do you want your student teams/groups to be more effective? Try adding more structures to your student teams/groups. Two of the leaders in cooperative learning research, David and Roger Johnson, are at the University of Minnesota, and the resources listed below are based on their work.

How is your group project like the zombie apocalypse?

What is cooperative learning?

“Cooperative Learning involves structuring classes around small groups that work together in such a way that each group member’s success is dependent on the group’s success. There are different kinds of groups for different situations, but they all balance some key elements that distinguish cooperative learning from competitive or individualistic learning.”

Five key elements of cooperative groups

One strategy that is helpful for individual accountability is to assign roles. These may be specific to a discipline (e.g., shop manager, safety officer, etc.), to a project (e.g., farmer, business owner, taxpayer), or more generic (e.g., timekeeper, recorder, summarizer). To help students develop group skills, using placards might be helpful.

What is the best way to form teams/groups?

Research has shown that random teams work best. You could count off in class, use playing cards to place students by numbers or suits, or use D2L to form random groups. This article suggests other strategies.

How can I assess team/group work?

  • Check out the AACU VALUE Rubric for teamwork. Designed by teams of faculty, you are encouraged to modify them for your needs. Level one is what might be expected from a first year student, level two is for a second year student, etc.
  • If you are interested in using the VALUE rubrics for assessment in your classes, contact Cheryl Norman for more information.

How can I use D2L to help me include teams/groups in my classes?

Students can be placed into D2L groups either by you or randomly in D2L. Then, the various tools can be linked to the groups. For example, discussion forums/topics can be restricted to groups and grades can be entered by groups. For more information, contact the eLearning team via the Digital Resource Lab (DRL@minneapolis.com).

Where can I learn more about cooperative learning?

How can I get relevant, confidential and timely feedback on my teaching? Request a 5&5 Assessment! For more information, or to place your request, please contact: ctl@minneapolis.edu by no later than Friday, July 10th. Due to reduced Summer CTL credits, availability is limited.

What are upcoming faculty-development opportunities?  Check the Events page of the CTL website.

CTL just announced a Summer Teaching Circle on the topic Syllabi (re)Design.

How can I learn more about using D2L in my classes?  Contact drl@minneapolis.edu

Where can I get help with teaching or other parts of my teaching role?  Email ctl@minneapolis.edu

If you have ideas for future Teaching Tips or would like to write a guest blog post for the CTL blog, please contact Jennifer.Sippel@minneapolis.edu Thanks!

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Summer 2015 Teaching Circle

Syllabi (re)Design Success! an MCTC CTL Teaching Circle, facilitated by Holly Fairchild

Have you been meaning to rework your syllabi, but haven’t made the time? Do you wish to collaborate with other faculty across disciplines to gain ideas on how to create the best syllabi for your courses and your students? Are you looking for a way to stay engaged in professional development over the summer? If you answered yes to any of these questions, CTL has an opportunity for you! Join the summer teaching circle focused on Syllabi (re)Design.

The outcomes of the circle would be two-fold: one being faculty would work on an individual project (i.e.- revising one of their syllabi) and the other being the creation of one (or possibly more) syllabus template(s) that would be designed specifically for MCTC faculty to adopt, modify, use and share. The faculty from this circle will present their work through a session (time/date TBD) during Fall 2015 Opening Days.

This teaching circle will run if we have 4 or more faculty interested and available to participate. Tentative meetings times would be scheduled on the following Friday mornings and/or afternoons: 6/26, 7/10, 7/17, 7/24. If those times do not work, other possible meeting times would be during select afternoons M-Th.

If you are interested in joining this circle, please contact Jennifer.Sippel@minneapolis.edu by noon on Wednesday, June 17th. Please include the following information in your email response:

  1. ]Are you available on the Fridays listed? (Please specify if you are available all, or which ones)
  2. Are you available M-Th afternoons? (Please specify which ones you are generally available during summer session)
  3. Are you attending Fall 2015 Opening Days?

Holly Fairchild has been a faculty member in the Reading & Study Skills department since 2008, and has participated in numerous teaching circles as well as the New Faculty Seminar. She has created a visual syllabus, which is a work in progress, and is currently in the process of incorporating her learning objectives into the assignment schedule and is hoping to continue this work in collaboration with other faculty.

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Week 2 Summer Teaching Tips

We hope your summer session is off to a great start. These tips are geared toward the second week of class and include ideas for easy ways to break up lectures and engage students!

What are the most important things to do this second week of class?

  • Check in with your students about the class, syllabus, and class policies. For example, have students write what they are most excited to learn and what about the class makes them most anxious.
  • If students have not yet attended or participated in an online class, go into eServices and report a last day of attendance (LDA). This saves the college money and can free up seats if students are still trying to get in.
  • If students want to add your class or switch sections, late registration forms can be submitted through Monday.  Please see the note on the form about adding students over your cap.
  • If you have not already done so, post your office hours outside of your office door (and within D2L).  Remember we are required to have one hour of posted office hours for each three credits we teach.

What is the easiest way to break up a lecture and make my class more active?

How can I get relevant, confidential and timely feedback on my teaching? Request a 5&5 Assessment! For more information, or to place your request, please contact: ctl@minneapolis.edu by no later than Friday, July 10th. Due to reduced Summer CTL credits, availability is limited.

What are upcoming faculty-development opportunities?  Check the Events page of the CTL website. NOTE: Plan ahead! There are a few events coming up that require pre-registration, including: Diversity Palaver: “Understanding the Concept of White Disadvantage” and the MN eLearning Summit

CTL will also be running a Summer Teaching Circle on the topic: Syllabus (re)Design. More details about this opportunity forthcoming.

How can I learn more about using D2L in my classes?  Contact drl@minneapolis.edu

Where can I get help with teaching or other parts of my teaching role?  Email ctl@minneapolis.edu

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Week 1 Summer Teaching Tips

What are the most important things to do on the first days of class?

  • Engage your students starting on day one.  This will help to create community, show students the types of interactions and activities that will take place in your class, and help students practice learning strategies.
  • Have students exchange contact information with at least one other student.
  • Use interactive strategies to address the syllabus – see activities listed below.
  • Have students write about expectations, barriers, strategies for overcoming barriers, and the like.  Then, collect, read, and comment on these.
  • Pick one strategy in each category of 26 Strategies for Success in Your Classroom

Many more ideas for the first weeks of class are in the following resources:

101 Things You Can Do the First Three Weeks of Class

The_First_Day_of_Class

Ten_Unspoken_Questions_from_New_College_Students_During_the_First_Days_of_Class

First Day of Class What Can Should We Do

What are creative ways to address the syllabus during the first day of class?  The syllabus is an important document that addresses essentials of the class. Our advice is to engage students in classroom activities to learn about your course policies.  Examples of activities include:

  • syllabus scavenger hunt (for example, a worksheet with scenarios to help students find important policies)
  • syllabus quiz (consider also using one around the time of your first major assignment or test to help re-enforce policies related to these and other issues that have come up)
  • jigsaw discussion (for example, assign groups of students to different pages of the syllabus then have them share what they learned)
  • activity to have students create a list of what they want to know about the syllabus or your course (then have students find the answers)
  • think-pair-share where students ask each other “what questions do you have about the syllabus?” (students are often more likely to ask a peer questions than asking the instructor in front of the whole class; phrasing the question this way can communicate that you expect them to have questions)

Where do I submit my syllabus? academicaffairs@minneapolis.edu   For more information, see the email from Academic Affairs.

What are upcoming faculty-development opportunities?  Check the Events page of the CTL website. CTL will also be running a Summer Teaching Circle on the topic: Syllabus (re)Design. More details about this opportunity forthcoming.

What should I read over the summer? CTL invites you to read any of the following books over the summer to discuss during Fall Opening Days (Aug19-21, 2015):

Back to School: Why Everyone Deserves A Second Chance at Education by Mike Rose

Blindspot: Hidden Biases of Good People by Mahzarin R. Banaji

Creating Significant Learning Experiences: An Integrated Approach to Designing College Courses by L. Dee Fink

Make it Stick: The Science of Successful Learning by Peter C. Brown

Pedagogy of the Oppressed* by Paul Freire

*facilitated discussions of Pedagogy of the Oppressed will be scheduled on an ongoing basis during Fall 2015 semester.

CTL made copies of these books available for checkout through the Resource Library in T2000. You are invited to stop by to see if there are any copies available before purchasing yourself, or check your local library.

How can I make my course textbook (or other required resources) more accessible to my students? Put it on Reserve in the MCTC Library. For more information about how to do that, email circdesk@minneapolis.edu

How can I learn more about using D2L in my classes?  Contact drl@minneapolis.edu

Where can I get help with teaching or other parts of my teaching role?  Email ctl@minneapolis.edu

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Teaching Tips for Finals Week – Outstanding Advice from Outstanding Educators

This will be the last Teaching Tips email until a pre-semester Tips in late summer.  Your summer team of CTL Consultants is listed at the bottom of this message (see email from Gail about CTL transitions).  ​

We hope to see all of you on Friday where we will start the day by reflecting back on the year and celebrating the work that we have done to improve student success.  Please also plan to attend the Employee Appreciate Event to celebrate the work done campus wide.  We then have a great list of Concurrent Sessions in the afternoon.  In the spirit of these celebrations, we asked MCTC’s Outstanding Educators to provide advice to other faculty; this was compiled into a PowerPoint: Outstanding Advice.

What faculty-development opportunities are available yet this semester?  For additional listings, go to: https://mctcctl.wordpress.com/news/faculty-development-opportunities/

May 15, 2015 Faculty Development Day Schedule

8:00-10:30 am – All Faculty Session – Let’s Make a DEAL: Develop. Evaluate. Act. Learn. Come and engage in this all-faculty session ready to Develop your teaching and learning; Evaluate your students, courses, programs, and Common Course Outlines; Act through writing, planning, changing; Learn about your community.

10:30-10:45 am – break

10:45-11:45 am – Employee Appreciation Event

11:45-1 pm – Lunch Options TBA

1-1:15 pm – travel time

1:15-2:30 pm – Concurrent Sessions

2:45 – 4 pm – Concurrent Sessions

note: to allow for maximum participation during faculty development day, please do not schedule PDD or other meetings during this day, including during the afternoon sessions.

May 18, 2015 Faculty Development Day Schedule

May CTL Social: Pre-Graduation Social! | Thursday, May 21st | Each May, MCTC holds a graduation ceremony to celebrate the many academic accomplishments of our students. All MCTC employees are invited to join CTL at 5 pm for an informal pre-graduation social gathering at Craft Bar and Lounge at the Minneapolis Convention Center, followed by the MCTC Graduation Ceremony @ 7pm in the Minneapolis Convention Center Auditorium (auditorium doors will open for seating at 6pm). The cost of parking at most ramps near the convention center is approximately $10. You could also park in the MCTC parking ramp for $5 (or $2.50 with a prepaid parking card) and walk; the Convention Center is less than a half mile from the MCTC campus. Please RSVP to ctl@minneapolis.edu by Wed, May 14th if you plan to attend. Thank you!  (Please note that the day was incorrect in our previous communications – sorry for any confusion)

How and when do I enter my grades?

  • Go to eServices – note that this interface has changed.
    • ​The link can be found throughthe MCTC web page Employee pull-down menu.
    • Log in with your StarID and password
    • Pull down the faculty menu in the upper-left corner and select “Grade & LDA Entry”
    • Use pull-down menu to change semester, if needed
    • Click course title
    • Click View/Enter Grades
    • Use pull-down menus for student participation and grade, and enter Last Date of Attendance, if applicable.
    • Scroll to bottom to save as draft or post final grades (if saving as a draft, remember to return to post final grades before the deadline)
    • Contact the Records Office if you need help with this process.
  • May 20this the last day to add grades, 3 business days after the end of the term excluding Professional Development days.
  • If you need to make grade changes after the deadline please email recordsfaculty@minneapolis.edu. Our office is monitoring this email address daily and processing requests within 1-2 business days.
  • Grade/LDA questions or problems can also be directed to recordsfaculty@minneapolis.edu.
  • When you draft grades they are not visible to students, however once you post grades they will be visible to students.

 

CTL Campus Leaders (Summer 15)

jenny sippel, CTL Programming Consultant

Lisa Bergin, CTL Programming Consultant

Cheryl Norman, CTL Assessment Consultant

Jennifer Malarski, CTL eLearning Consultant

Miki Huntington, CTL eLearning Consultant

Maran Wolston, CTL eLearning Innovations Consultant

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